02x06 - Two-Ply (or not Two-Ply)

[SPITS]

[SPITS]

[LIGHT SWITCH CLICKS]

[LIGHT SWITCH CLICKS]

[LIGHT SWITCH CLICKS]

Morning, roomie.

Morning, roomie.

I'm going to the market later. You need more apples?

No, but we need more toilet paper.

No prob.

May I?

No prob.

[CHUCKLES]

Angel Fluff Plus, two-ply, unscented, ultra-wide, extra soft.

Two-ply. No prob.

Y-You have to hang the toilet paper on the dispenser the correct way.

The paper goes over on the top, not under hanging against the wall.

Sorry, I forgot you like it like that.

I don't "like it like that."

It's "right" like that.

NBD.

It's no big deal.

I got to run.

[DOOR OPENS, CLOSES]

[UP-TEMPO VIOLIN MUSIC PLAYING]

Ms. Kohl?

Hi, I'm Dr. Melendez.

Sorry. I have to practice whenever I can.

I practice whenever I can, too.

We heard you hurt your finger.

Can we take a look?

I got a crappy manicure a couple days ago, and now my nail looks disgusting.

Paronychia... it's an abscess caused by a common bacterial infection.

We'll drain it, pack it, and send you home.

In hours, the pain and swelling will be much better, and you'll be back to Paganini.

Apologize already.

- [CHUCKLES] I did nothing wrong.
- So?

You don't want to be iced out by the future Chief of Surgery forever.

Lim could be Chief, too. Andrews hasn't decided yet.

Hey, Brown, Park. Hustle in.

EMTs are less than a minute out.

Park, make sure Bay 's good to go.

EMT: -year-old female.

Progressively worsening epistaxis.

Bolus on the bus. BP / .

It won't stop! I can't get it to stop!

BRUCE: I got home, and she was calling .

Not your first nosebleed, huh, Dad?

Well, these things usually go away on their own, but Riley claims she's been like this for over an hour.

Ugh! It's not a claim, it's a fact!

Gonna need to get her on a monitor right away and apply % phenylephrine solution.

Gonna need to cauterize the bleed.

It's not my first nosebleed either.

I have my premiere at Davies this weekend, hence the manicure.

Rosin, beeswax... that stuff is tough to get off.

You play?

I know my way around bow strings.

I dabbled in archery when I was in high school.

I started when I was .

I used to hum melodies doing my homework, eating dinner, taking out the trash.

I wanted to be a train conductor.

Mm, there's still time.

[INHALES SHARPLY]

- Ow.
- She's numbed up.

She shouldn't have any pain in her finger.

It's not my finger.

It's further up, by my knuckle.

- [THERMOMETER BEEPING]
- No fever.

Any body aches?

Uh, a little.

Playing violin all day stresses out my neck and shoulders.

It's likely tendonitis or mild arthritic pain.

Or it might be flesh-eating bacteria and we have may have to cut off your finger.

There's the bleeder, at the posterior rim of Kiesselbach's plexus.

You called ?

She did.

How you feeling, baby?

Peachy.

It's a nosebleed. I'm handling it.

She's my kid, too, Bruce.

Bet you couldn't tell they're divorced.

PARK: Well, why don't I take Riley's parents to the waiting room so we can...

Talk about me.

Adiós.

We need to know.

Shaun, what do we need to do to know for sure?

We need to cut deeper and get a swab.

Fingers have thousands of nerve endings.

Clipping off even the tiniest portion of Jas's finger could cause permanent damage and be career-ending.

But if it is necrotizing fasciitis and we do nothing, she could die.

That would also end her career.

True.

But the numbers, Shaun, the data.

There's almost no chance that it's nec fasc.

On the other hand, if we test for it, we will definitely do damage.

Anything else?

Do you hang your toilet paper going over or under?

Doesn't matter.

STELLA: Before the nosebleeds, it was tummy aches, insomnia, breathing pain.

Every time, we'd rush her to the pediatrician, but they couldn't find anything, so we stopped taking her.

You think she's faking it?

A therapist said it was likely her subconscious way of trying to get her family back together.

Well, divorce isn't easy for adults.

Why should kids be able to deal with it any better?

She disengaged, not just from us, but her friends, school.

It's been five years.

She should have found her new normal by now.

[SIGHS]

Looks like someone's doing better.

Nosebleed stopped, but Riley's nasal membranes are pretty thin.

You should be on the lookout for future bleeds.

Riley, have you been sniffing or snorting any drugs lately?

What? No way. I wouldn't do that.

There's a lot of stuff out there that looks harmless,

- but...
- She said no.

Does FLONASE count?

I was coughing.

I had a stuffy nose, itchy throat.

I looked up my symptoms, because what the hell else was I supposed to do?

Vasomotor rhinitis fit.

So I went to the drug store, and I got some FLONASE.

Misuse of steroid sprays can thin out nasal membranes, causing terrible nosebleeds.

Quit the FLONASE, you're good to go.

Thank you.

Uh, I need you to take her tonight.

I had to skip a pitch to an important V.C. to get here.

Sorry, didn't mean to take you away from anything important.

You're provoking her.
You know she's an anxious kid.

I'm not anxious, I'm sick.

Could you for once have my back?

- What?
- This is your fault.

She's playing us against each other.

[BREATHING RAGGEDLY]

What's wrong?

My breathing, i-it hurts.

Just relax, sweetie.

Just stop, both of you.

[COUGHING]

Vasomotor rhinitis.

That is a pretty unique diagnosis for an th grader.

You'll be numb in a minute.

th.

And I was wrong.

Doesn't matter.

I get what you're going through.

You were smart, popular.

We don't have anything in common.

I was never popular.

I wore hand-me-downs from Goodwill.

I never knew my dad.

My mom was sick. I couldn't rely on her.

You know, kids at that age can be total...

Jerks.

Asshats. Turds.

I wouldn't send my worst enemy back to junior high.

I got so many D's on my report card last year, I got held back.

Now everyone treats me like I'm stupid.

It's humiliating. [INHALES SHARPLY]

How'd you deal with it?

I said screw it.

They already think I'm bad.

I mess around in class, leave campus, do whatever the hell I want.

But you're still angry.

I didn't let my past define me...

and yours doesn't have to define you.

Repeating a grade doesn't make you...

What?

What's wrong?

Nothing.

There doesn't seem to be any active bleeding.

But I coughed up blood. That was real.

It's possible it's just post-nasal aspiration... that the blood you coughed up was from the initial nosebleed,

and it went down your throat, into your lungs.

But my chest, it really hurts.

LEA: Hey, Shaun. What's up?

You forgot to put your coffee cup in the dishwasher before you left.

Sorry, I was in a rush.

And remember, rinse it out before you put it in the dishwasher.

- Noted.
- And on the top rack.

- I got to go.
- Me too.

Morgan doesn't want to know what's wrong with our patient.

I find that hard to believe.

They talk about bow strings.

I don't know anything about bow strings.

They should be talking about what's wrong with her.

You can't always know, Shaun.

Sometimes tests aren't worth it.

Sometimes we don't have the right tests.

[DOOR OPENS]

What are you doing in here?

Lea and I disagree about toilet paper.

And you made a good point about finding the right test.

Thanks?

I just did a test.

On toilet paper?

Every toilet paper roll in this restroom has the paper hanging over, not under, and they were installed by professionals.

Does it matter?

[CELLPHONE BUZZES]

I-D-G-A...

I think it's an acronym or maybe even an anagram.

I don't think Lea cares about the toilet paper debate.

It's not a debate. I'm right.

I think you should talk to Lea.

Not text, talk.

Did you talk to Dr. Melendez after you got in trouble with him?

- No.
- Why not?

Because I did nothing wrong.

Because you were right.

- Yeah.
- So am I.

[SIGHS]

IRIS: Make sure all four tips are touching the ground before you take a step.

Well, thank you, Iris.

I never would have figured that out.

I'm required to show you how to use all medical equipment.

[DOORBELL RINGS]

Well, I'm not gonna use it.
You want to know why?

- Huh?
- Because I'm not gonna use it.

You remind me of my Grandpa Eddie.

So grumpy, so adorable.

See? Look... no hands.

I'm fine.

Uh, chicken soup... heard it's good for the soul.

I wasn't expecting you. Thank you.

That's very thoughtful.

It's... Really, it's no big deal.

I signed up to bring you food at the hospital, the Meal Train that they set up.

- The Meal Train, yeah.
- Yeah.

How... How are you doing today?

Well, today is actually looking up.

Good.

You want to come in and have some soup?

I have other plans.

Ah, yeah.

But, um...

I'm actually free tomorrow.

Do you like lasagna?

I kind of love lasagna.

Great.

Finally get that second date.

- You know, you don't have to...
- No, Aaron.

I want to.

Well, then, I want to.

[CHUCKLES]

Okay. Great.

Then, um...

I will see you, then, tomorrow.

I'll see you tomorrow.

[MONITOR BEEPING]

No one dabbles in archery unless they're at summer camp.

How long did you do it?

Seven days a week for seven years.

Why'd you stop?

It was just time to go to college, medical school, be a grown-up.

It was that easy to just quit?

Archery doesn't fill concert halls or pay the bills.

She has a slight fever, her rash is spreading, and she has edema.

This is definitely not paronychia.

I know. I've moved on to MRSA.

That's possible, but you should want proof.

If we do an open, deep-tissue biopsy, we will know for sure if you have flesh-eating...

Shaun.

[BEEPING CONTINUES]

[INDISTINCT PA ANNOUNCEMENT]

Part of being a good doctor is knowing when to not scare the crap out of a patient.

I don't think so.

This is your problem, not hers...your need to be sure, your obsession, y...

We need to cut off a small piece of her finger so we know if we have to cut off a larger...

Shaun, you're acting like you want to amputate her hand.

No. You're acting like you don't want to amputate her hand.

I don't.

But that's not medically relevant.

Her temperature is .

It's gone up two degrees since we've been arguing.

Okay. We'll test her.

That tissue has begun to die.

Or it's inflammatory infiltration.

Find anything?

W-We're at an impasse.

Look here, at the margin.

Subcutaneous fat and fascial necrosis.

Shaun was right.

Let's go try to save her hand.

She is a young girl with a lot going on.

Well, we agree on that much.

That's why she needs to see a shrink.

Mnh. This...

This feels different.

What, you don't believe in emotional intelligence?

If I have to choose between the battery of tests we've done and your gut, it's an easy choice.

No. You don't relate to her, and if you don't relate to her, you can't understand her.

You're probably right.

You think you do relate.

Well, do you have a kid?

My opinion about Riley is medical.

Why haven't you told any of us you have a kid?

That is a huge chunk of your life you've been hiding.

I don't feel the need to share everything about my personal life with the people I work with.

Oh, that's your passive-aggressive way of saying I'm an over-sharer?

Yeah.

Your opinion on Riley is clearly skewed because you're looking at her through a parental lens.

I've been in her shoes.

I'm better equipped to evaluate her situation.

You're the poster child of skewed.

You're too emotionally involved and are overreacting because you had a crappy mom

- who didn't care about you.
- [LAUGHS]

And why do I know all that?

Because you're an over-sharer.

- [INHALES SHARPLY]
- [MONITOR BEEPS]

The scan's clean.

Is it time to send her home?

MELENDEZ: Clamp.

[MONITOR BEEPING]

Whoa. That is not good.

Muscle's weak. Clamp slid right through the fascia.

Murphy, pull the skin back.

Smells like rotten eggs.

There's only tissue damage.

If we debride her hand carefully, we can preserve some mobility and dexterity.

She's gonna need close monitoring post-op tonight.

Scissors.

[LIGHT SWITCH CLICKS]

[LIGHT SWITCH CLICKS]

We need to talk.

Can it wait? I'm late for an all-night coding session.

You hung the toilet paper incorrectly.

Right. Did you flip it?

Great, we're done.

You left the TV remote on the couch.

Shaun, I'm running late.

You have to put it on the tray on the coffee table.

That is where it belongs.

If it doesn't have a set place, then it will be in many places and then it will get lost

and if I can't find it, I can't watch the Weather Channel...

Okay, enough about the damn remote!

Everything in this place has to be your way.

We have to make sure to use two pods in the washing machine, we have to keep the cups to the left of the plate,

we have to keep the air conditioner at exactly , and we have to use one very specific, very hard-to-find toilet paper.

And I'm trying to be accommodating, but you are not cutting me any slack.

Oh, God.

Shaun.

Shaun, I am sorry. I'm... Are you okay?

You have a ruptured Achilles.

I'm afraid your weekend warrior days are over...

Help! Can we get some help here?

Right there.

What happened?

She couldn't sleep, uh, she spiked a fever.

It's only getting worse.

[BREATHING RAGGEDLY] I can't breathe.

Take a deep breath, in, out.

- [THERMOMETER BEEPS]
- . .

I need IV acetaminophen and cooling blankets ASAP.

She's tachypneic with an O SAT of .

Is this... Is this something new or...

Did... I mean, did she do this to herself?

She has an infection.

I think she's developed pneumonia due to an underlying condition.

What underlying condition?

I have no idea. Page Park and Lim.

No signs of PE or pneumonia.

CFTR was negative for cystic fibrosis.

I think we may have missed something on her CT.

There... that slight shadow on the bronchus.

A slow-growing carcinoid tumor could cause chronic airway inflammation.

As the tumor grows, symptoms worsen, leading to airway obstruction and infection.

Or it's just a shadow, a slight shadow.

It is pretty subtle.

I would like to do exploratory VATS.

You want to poke holes in her chest and go rooting around in her lungs?

Riley's body's already compromised.

There are no obvious lesions, and her symptoms are more likely indicators of a simple sinus infection.

The safer, better plan is to treat with antibiotics.

If she has a progressing tumor, we can't just send her home with medication.

Pitch the surgery to the parents and Riley.

Okay.

Hey, hey, hey!

Don't touch those. Those are vintage.

Well, I'm just scooting your toys over so it's easier to get to your medication.

Toys. Toys?

These are not toys.

That's Reggie Jackson.

IRIS: Well, when that timer goes off, Roger Johnson can give you your medicine.

Reggie Jackson.

[DOORBELL RINGS]

Hey, guess what.

Quitting time.

Okay. Have fun.

- Take your pills.
- Yeah.

[DOORBELL RINGS]

[EXHALES HEAVILY]

[BREATHES DEEPLY]

I think I broke Shaun.

- Hi.
- We got into a big fight, huge, and I was yelling and he just fell apart.

It was awful.

And he pushes and pushes and pushes. I pushed back.

Well, Shaun's not easy, but you knew that.

I knew it was gonna be hard, but living with him is a lot.

I know.

I mean, there's stuff I've never even thought about.

And I know he has idiosyncrasies, but there's a lot of them. I mean, a lot.

I know. Is Shaun okay?

Yes. No. I don't know.

He's at work.

Glassy, you know him, like really know him.

How do I deal with Shaun?

Well, it's been years, and I'm still learning.

He just always has to be right.

I mean, do you... do you know how many calls and texts and notes he's left me about how I'm doing stuff wrong?

I have a pretty good idea, yeah.

Yeah, well, it's exhausting.

You know what? We all have quirks.

We can all be a pain in the ass from time to time.

Okay, admittedly Shaun a little more so.

That is not helpful.

- Sit down.
- What?

- Sit down.
- Why?

Why? Because you're agitated and you're annoying me and I can't give you good advice in that state.

Sit.

Thank you.

Do you like Shaun?

- Of course.
- Why?

He's sweet, kind, honest, sometimes brutally honest, there's never an agenda with him.

He's just Shaun.

So?

So I want him to change... a little.

You moved in expecting him to change?

He doesn't want you to change.

I know that.

And if I made the wrong decision?

Then you move out and you do it right now.

It'll devastate him, but the longer you wait, the more... [SIGHS]

...the worse it will be for him.

CLAIRE: If Riley has a tumor, we need to open her up to find out what we're dealing with.

Why do you think she has a tumor?

It's consistent with her symptoms.

The same symptoms she's been having for years?

Yes.

The same symptoms we've been told are psychological, the same symptoms a dozen doctors have run a hundred tests for and found nothing?

There is a shadow on her CT image.

A shadow?

And it's risky surgery?

Opening her up in a weakened state could be dangerous.

Look, I know Riley frustrates you, drives you crazy, but I also know you love her.

You have a chance to show her that.

So you want to do this as a statement?

[MONITOR BEEPING]

We want you to believe in your daughter, because that's what a parent does.

When she was little and had a bad dream, she used to come into our room and snuggle up under your arm, just like she's doing to me.

You would stroke her face until she was finally at peace and fell asleep.

[SNIFFLES]

[VOICE BREAKING] She's in so much pain, and I don't know how to make it go away.


[SNIFFS]

Riley?

Hey, um...

The doctors, t-they want to see what's going on in your lungs.

They think you might have a tumor.

And we want them to operate.

You think I have a real tumor?

It's scary, I know, but... yes, we do.

[MONITOR BEEPING RAPIDLY]

MORGAN: Her BP's dropping out... / .

Heart rate is spiking to .

- Hang an IV saline bolus.
- I need a -lead.

The necrosis has migrated.

She's septic.

There's definite infiltration to the bone.

We're gonna have to amputate her arm.

[SAW BUZZING]

[MONITOR BEEPING]

Polish the bone to help stump healing.

Rasp.

The margins appear to be clean.

There's still a small chance microbes may have spread to her organs.

If they did, then her mortality rate just increased exponentially.

What if we put her in hyperbaric oxygen therapy now?

Oxygen's toxic to bacteria.

There's a lot of things that could go wrong in there.

We wouldn't be able to decompress the chamber in time to help her.

We wouldn't have to wait to help her if someone goes in with her.

I'll do it.

Okay. Get the chamber ready.

Lung tissue looks normal.

And there are healthy-appearing bronchi.

Nothing... yet.

[MONITOR BEEPING RAPIDLY]

Damn it. Tore a lobar artery.

J.L.: BP is / , oxygen SATS , heart rate is going up. She is tanking.

Park, I need more suction. I can't see a thing in here.

We need to do an open thoracotomy now.

- Browne, crack her chest.
- blade and a rib spreader.

There are only . cubic meters in there.

How does it feel?

It's fine.

I thought it might feel claustrophobic for someone neurotypical.

It is.

[MONITOR BEEPING RAPIDLY]

Got it.

It's still bleeding.

J.L.: Stroke volume just bottomed out.

Rapid infuse liters of whole blood.

Get ready to start cardiac massage.

Wait. I think I have an anchor in the arterial wall.

J.L.: Stroke volume is rising, BP increasing, / .

Pulse is and regular.

She's stable for now.

[MONITOR BEEPING STEADILY]

This was a mistake.

We need to close her up as soon as possible.

It doesn't make any sense.

Her arterial wall shouldn't be this fragile.

Something else has caused it to thin out.

What else is going on in here?

Browne, I need more light.

Yeah. See that?

A localized granuloma on the right lower lobe.

You think it's cancer?

Not sure but something's in there.

Park, retract the lung.

[BEEPING CONTINUES]

It's a LEGO.

Riley must've inhaled it years ago.

CLAIRE: It settled in your lung and became encased in inflammatory tissue.

Your body's immune response attacked it, making you progressively more sick over the years.

PARK: It's small, thin, and made of plastic.

There was no way of seeing it on any of the imaging.

Ugh. This is so gross.

I'm gonna make it into a necklace.

[LAUGHTER]

Good luck. Excuse me.

We're sorry that we didn't believe in you.

We're sorry that we put you through all this.

We're sorry that we got divorced.

Whoa.

You guys are way better off apart.

W-We always thought you were upset because we split up.

I was upset because you fought all the time.

You still do.

It freaked me out.

So I'd hide in my princess tent, bite my nails, gnaw on crayons...

- ...chew on LEGOs.
- [CHUCKLES]

We screwed up, and we promise we can do better.

I am not saying that "Ordinary People" is not a good movie. I'm...

It's a good... It's a great movie.

[CHUCKLING] It's a great movie.

Okay, but I'm saying is that "Raging Bull" is a superior cinematic experience.

It is raw. It's, like, romantic.

- It's romantic?
- Yeah!

It pummels you from start to finish.

Exactly. Exactly.

It's like adrenaline is pulsing through your veins.

It leaves me breathless every time I watch it.

Oh!

[SOFT JAZZ MUSIC PLAYING]

Do you... Do you want to, like, go for a walk?

Well, it's a little cold outside.

[BOTH LAUGH]

- I'm gonna kiss you.
- You are?

- Uh-huh.
- Okay.

Mm.

- Maybe we'll walk upstairs?
- Okay.

- Yeah?
- Yeah.

- This way?
- Yeah.

Yeah.

Whoa. [GROANS]

- C-Can... Can I help?
- No. Thank you.

I'll get there. I'm okay, I'm okay.

I'm okay. Ow.

[INHALES, EXHALES SHARPLY]

[MONITOR BEEPING]

Is my hand okay?

Your biopsy was positive for necrotizing fasciitis.

We had to do multiple surgeries to remove the infected muscle and bone.

Bone?

I'm so sorry, Jas.

We had to amputate your arm.

No.

No, my... my arm still hurts.

I can... I can feel it. It's still there.

What you're experiencing is "phantom pain."

Your arm is gone.

[SOBS]

H-He told you.

My arm.

[CRYING] My arm is gone.

It's gone and...and it's... it's your fault.

[SNIFFLES]

[WEAKLY] Get out.

Get the hell out.

I can't.

Neither of us can.

[SNIFFLES]

[SOBBING]

You called it.

Well done.

Thanks for your help.

Finally a believer in the power of emotional intelligence?

Oh, it did get her parents on board, even if it's only for a little while.

They believe their kid, and they're working on their family relationships.

It's pretty big steps.

It was a nice moment.

But if you think you changed them, that they'll be different people tomorrow than they were yesterday, then you're kidding yourself.

Right now, my emotional intelligence is telling me even you don't believe that.

[ELEVATOR BELL DINGS]

[ELEVATOR DOORS OPEN]

[FOOTSTEPS APPROACHING]

Kitchen's clean, leftovers are in the fridge.

How you doing?

Fine.

I just got a little lightheaded.

Balance isn't quite back to normal.

Well, now that you're feeling a little better, you want to watch "Raging Bull"?

No.

Okay. Another time.

No.

I can't do this.

We can take it slow.

I'm... I'm happy to just be here with you, like this.

No. I can't... I can't be here like this.

I-I-I don't want you to f...

I just... I don't want to...

I'm sorry. I just... I need you to go, please.

[DOOR OPENS, CLOSES]

Jas practiced violin every day since she was .

She put all her faith in me to do the right thing, and...

I thought I did. I...

Shaun didn't care. He...

He didn't see her dreams. He just saw her symptoms.

Sometimes that'll be the wrong choice.

My second year in the program, there was this resident.

She was kind of weird.

She wore comic book T-shirts, always ate the exact same lunch.

But she was smart.

She would get surgeries and knock 'em out of the park over and over again.

Couldn't stand her.

And one day I realized I was competing against her, but she wasn't competing against me.

She spent her time observing, asking questions, preparing herself to be a great surgeon.

[SIGHS]

Is she?

Dr. Lim is one of the best trauma surgeons in the country.

[SNIFFLES]

[ELEVATOR BELL DINGS]

- Dr. Melendez.
- Dr. Browne.

Dr. Lim.

Nice save today.

I heard. Yes, good work, Dr. Browne.

Thank you.

[ELEVATOR BELL DINGS]

[ELEVATOR DOORS OPEN]

Good night.

[ELEVATOR DOORS CLOSE]

You know she showed bad judgment.

You got something to say, just say it.

Want to grab a beer?

Yes.

[SIREN WAILS IN DISTANCE]

Hey.

Are you okay?

Yes.

I'm so sorry for my outburst yesterday.

I'm fine now.

I'm not, Shaun.

Coming back to California and starting a new job and moving in with you...

it's been so stressful, harder than I anticipated.

You're moving out.

No, I'm not moving out.

We are still figuring out each other's quirks.

[EXHALES HEAVILY] Oh, yes.

You're very difficult to live with.

[LAUGHS]

I know I forget stuff a lot, and sometimes I snap and yell.

I promise to work on that.

And I don't need you to change, but I do need to know that you know you're annoying as hell.

I need to know that you'll try to compromise.

I don't think I can use one-ply toilet paper.

Oh, no, you were so right about two-ply.

Totally worth the extra $ . .

But maybe the cups can go to the right of the plates.

Sometimes.

Well, everything's unpacked.

We're officially moved in together.

[CHUCKLES]

I'm gonna take these down to the recycling.

And I know I probably didn't put everything in the right place, but maybe we can rearrange it together.

I like that idea very much.

[CHUCKLES]

[MONDO COZMO'S "TONIGHT TONIGHT" PLAYS]

♪ All I am is all I need ♪

♪ And these city-boy blues and these suicide queens ♪

♪ And I said what I said 'cause I love you so much ♪

♪ Now I'm pulling these wires on this cross-city bus ♪

♪ 'Cause tonight, tonight, tonight, tonight ♪

♪ Yeah, tonight, tonight, tonight, tonight ♪

♪ All I want is what I can't take ♪

♪ But tonight, tonight, tonight, tonight ♪

I like that idea very much.

♪ Tonight, tonight, tonight, tonight ♪